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Early Voting: Week of 10/24: AK, AR, ID, IL,TX, HI, LA, UT, WV, MD, FL, VA

Monday October 24

Tuesday October 25

Thursday October 27

Saturday October 29

 

When you vote, vote the whole ballot. Your down ballot candidates need you. If your state has initiatives or other ballot measures, your input is needed.

If you don’t live in the states above, you can type [“your state name” voting] into Google and get a voting schedule and requirements – BUT CHECK WITH YOUR STATE’S ELECTION OFFICE to make sure that’s the right information. It probably is, but don’t get disappointed.

Early Voting Week of 10/17: GA, TN, KS, NC,WA, NV

Want to get the 2016 election over with? If you live in one the states below, you likely can thanks to early voting. If you’ve made up your mind, vote this week and get it done:

Monday October 17

Wednesday October 19

  • Tennessee
  • Kansas – In some counties, early voting might be November 1-7

Thursday October 20

Friday October 21

Saturday October 22

 

When you vote, please vote the whole ballot, including initiatives if you have them. With Congress people think about whether you want to aid or hinder the next President in their agenda and vote accordingly.

If you don’t live in the states above, you can type [“your state name” voting] into Google and get a voting schedule and requirements – BUT CHECK WITH YOUR STATE’S ELECTION OFFICE to make sure that’s the right information. It probably is, but don’t get disappointed.

Sign if you agree: The next presidential debate needs to discuss SCOTUS

The first presidential debate did not include a single question about the Supreme Court. Now’s our chance to make sure it is brought up in the next one. It’s vital that perhaps the biggest issue on the ballot this November –the Supreme Court – gets adequate airtime during the first debate.

via Sign if you agree: The next presidential debate needs to discuss SCOTUS

Regardless of which side you fall on, I hope you will ask the moderators of the next debate to ask about the Supreme Court – both in terms of what sort of judge they’d look for and what groups, if any they’d expect to have input into the process.

How communities are using direct democracy to shape city budgets (Waging Nonviolence)

A recent poll conducted by Gallup found that the percentage of Americans who trust the public in handling issues is at an all-time low. Reasons for this vary, with eroded faith in institutions playing a role. Yet, in more than 40 neighborhoods across the United States, a new tool called participatory budgeting is boosting confidence among citizens in working with neighbors to solve problems together.

Participatory budgeting first began in Porto Alegre, Brazil in 1989. There, the Workers’ Party created a process allowing residents to submit ideas that would be eventually voted on. The most popular projects would receive funding from an allocated budget. This became popular among residents and is still in existence today.

via How communities are using direct democracy to shape city budgets

The idea of setting aside a certain amount of funds (like 0.5%) of city funding to be allocated through a direct democracy process sounds intriguing and might pull in more people to be involved with their towns.

Looking forward to hearing more examples.

Alaska: What’s at Stake on Election Day 2016

Regardless of party or presidential preference, I think you should go out and vote. Democracy wins when we’re all more engaged. Aside from deciding what legislators stay in or leave, we in Alaska have these two ballot propositions:

Ballot Measure No. 1
An Act Allowing Qualified Individuals to Register to Vote When Applying for a Permanent Fund Dividend.

Ballot Measure No. 2
Allow Debt for Postsecondary Student Loans

Due to self-imposed restrictions based on MPOW, I will not offer any recommendations on legislators. But I do want to explain why I plan to vote against both ballot measures.

On Ballot Measure No. 1 I think our biggest problem is turnout. I believe we need to figure out how to motivate people already registered to vote to get to the polls before expanding registration efforts. Especially since this will make more work for a staff already burdened with long call queues.

I’m against Ballot Measure No. 2 simply because our Legislature will not look at new funding sources. This rejection of additional funding combined with refusal to meaningfully cut is something that has already downgraded our bonds several times this year. Until such time as the Alaska Legislature chooses to stop spending our savings and enact new revenue sources, I plan to vote against any and all bond issues.

If you’re unsure of your voting status or the voting process here in Alaska, watch this video – then take action:

Can Automation Turn Fewer Jobs Into Better Ones? by John Nichols — YES! Magazine

Automation can and should eliminate drudgery, freeing people to work fewer hours for fairer compensation and to devote themselves to social advancement. To do this, however, citizens must assert themselves by demanding not just political but economic democracy. We must replace fantastical talk about “the future of work” with the honest understanding that there will be less work. We must shape a humane future in which corporate monopoly and inequality give way to a sharing society where technological progress benefits everyone.

via Can Automation Turn Fewer Jobs Into Better Ones? by John Nichols — YES! Magazine

Technological Unemployment has been a major concern of mine for at least a decade.  I think we’re starting to see it come into it’s own with Uber actually rolling out driverless cars in Cleveland. While these cars have human backups, I’m convinced this is just a transitional phase to get people comfortable with the idea of driverless cars.

If were are going to have an economy that works for all, I think we’re going to need the hard conversations that this Yes! article is calling for.

 

Court: Feds Cannot Prosecute Medical Marijuana In States Where Legal | PopularResistance.Org

The unanimous 9th Circuit ruling on Tuesday was issued by a three-judge panel, two of whom are Republican appointees with a history of pro-law enforcement opinions.

The U.S. Department of Justice cannot spend money to prosecute federal marijuana cases if the defendants comply with state guidelines that permit the drug’s sale for medical purposes, a federal appeals court ruled on Tuesday.

via Court: Feds Cannot Prosecute Medical Marijuana In States Where Legal | PopularResistance.Org

To me, this is a welcome victory for local control and sensible drug policy.

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