Three books on College (Alaska)

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to College, the home of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). Here is a description of Colleges’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

College is located 3 miles northwest of Fairbanks at mile 467.1 of the Alaska Railroad. The community lies at approximately 64.856940° North Latitude and -147.802780° West Longitude. (Sec. 5, T001S, R001W, Fairbanks Meridian.) College is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. Interior Alaska experiences seasonal temperature extremes. Average January temperatures range from -19 to -2 °F. Average July temperatures range from 49 to 71 °F. Annual precipitation averages 11.5 inches, and annual snowfall averages 67.8 inches. During the winter months, if the temperatures drops below -20 °F, ice fog can occur.

You can learn more about College by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with College as a subject, among others:

Van Cleve, Margaret. 1999. The first 50 years, 1949-1999: University Community Presbyterian Church, College, Alaska. College, Alaska: University Community Presbyterian Church.
 
University of Alaska (College). 1971. Fact book: the University of Alaska, College, Alaska. College: The University.
 
Hessler, Victor Peter, and Eugene Wescott. 1960. Earth current activity at College Alaska, 1956-1958. [College, Alaska]: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska.

 A WorldCat searching lesson. 90% of the time, a subject search is THE most effective ways to search a library catalog such as WorldCat. You can pull up related items even when the titles and some of the vocabularly don’t match the librarian assigned subject. The case of College Alaska, this breaks down. Doing the the subject search su: college (Alaska) brought up over 600 results, most of which seemed to be about colleges and universities in Alaska. So I chose to do a WorldCat title search of ti:”college alaska”, which gave me a little over a 100 books, most of which were either about or took place in College, Alaska. If what you’re looking for has common words that might appear in many subject headings, consider a title search.

I note that it is still way easier to bring up materials on College, Alaska on WorldCat than on Google. To be fair, a “college alaska” search on Google gives you a map and a wikipedia entry, but then it gives you all sorts of unrelated materials on colleges in Alaska that are far away from the community of College Alaska.

However, the first page of Google search results may eventually include this blog entry, which would allow the casual user to zero in better on College, Alaska. That is the power of librarian added value.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Cooper Landing.

Three books on Coldfoot

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Coldfoot. Here is a description of Coldfoot’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Coldfoot is located at the mouth of Slate Creek on the east bank of the Middle Fork Koyukuk River. It lies at mile 175 of the Dalton Highway, formerly known as the North Slope Haul Road. The community lies at approximately 67.256390° North Latitude and -150.184170° West Longitude. (Sec. 16, T028N, R012W, Fairbanks Meridian.) Coldfoot is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. The area encompasses 37.0 sq. miles of land and 0.0 sq. miles of water. The climate of the area is strongly continental. Temperatures range from -14 to 50 °F. Annual precipitation averages 10 inches, and snowfall averages 63 inches per year.

You can learn more about Coldfoot by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Coldfoot as a subject, among others:

Will, Susan M. 1981. Coldfoot, an historic mining community on the middle fork of the Koyukuk River, Alaska. Fairbanks, Alaska: Yukon Resource Area, Bureau of Land Management.
 

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to College, AK home of many university students and faculty, as one might expect.

Three Books on Cold Bay

Note: After this week “Three Books On …” is moving to Mondays. The next community will appear on May 2nd.

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This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Cold Bay. Here is a description of Cold  Bay’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Cold Bay is located in the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge at the western end of the Alaska Peninsula. It lies 634 miles southwest of Anchorage and 180 miles northeast of Unalaska. The community lies at approximately 55.185830° North Latitude and -162.721110° West Longitude. (Sec. 01, T058S, R089W, Seward Meridian.) Cold Bay is located in the Aleutian Islands Recording District. The area encompasses 54.4 sq. miles of land and 16.6 sq. miles of water. The city has a maritime climate, with temperatures ranging from 25 to 60 °F. The average annual rainfall is 36 inches, and average annual snowfall is 55 inches. Wind speeds of 30 mph are common for Cold Bay

You can learn more about Cold Bay by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Cold Bay as a subject, among others:

Wilson, Frederic H. 1997. Cold Bay quadrangle: Alaska resource data file. [Menlo Park, CA]: U.S. Geological Survey. Read online at http://ardf.wr.usgs.gov/quads/html/ColdBay.html.

Clawson, Linn E. 1993. The cost of living.
 
United States. 1973. On scene coordinator’s report: major oil spill, Cold Bay, Alaska. Anchorage, Alaska: U.S. Coast Guard].

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Coldfoot.

Three Books on Ester (Special)

Notes:

1) Thanks to some extra feedback on my “Three Books” survey, I’m definitely continuing the series. It seems it has a tiny but dedicated fan base and continuing this series also fits in with my impulse to share library resources.

2) In honor of the Ester person who left a comment, I am breaking my “by the alphabet” pattern in this series. According to the list at the Alaska Community Database, the community after Cohoe is Cold Bay.  We’ll get there next week. Today we take a special trip to Ester, Alaska.

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This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Ester. Here is a description of Ester’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Ester is located 8.5 miles west of Fairbanks on the George Parks Highway. The community lies at approximately 64.847220° North Latitude and -148.014440° West Longitude. (Sec. 07, T001S, R002W, Fairbanks Meridian.) Ester is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. Interior Alaska experiences seasonal temperature extremes. Average January temperatures range from -19 to -2 °F; average July temperatures range from 49 to 71 °F. Annual precipitation averages 11.5 inches, with 67.8 inches of snowfall.

You can learn more about Ester by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Ester as a subject, among others:

 
Stone, Tamsin E. 1990. Adaptive reuse of the Ester Dredge, Ester, Alaska. Thesis (B. Arch.)–Montana State University, 1990.
 
Alaska. 1971. Final environmental impact statement for project F-037-1(25): Ester 25 miles west. Springfield, Va: National Technical Information Service.
 
McCombe, John George. 1927. A study of the gold-bearing quartz veins of Ester Dome. [College, Alaska]: Alaska School of Mines.
 

In addition to the books above, you might want to check out the Ester Republic, a monthly publication known to some as a newspaper which describes itself as “the national rag of the independent people’s republic of ester.”

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Cold Bay.

Short Plea, Then Three Books on Cohoe

I’m back from two great weeks in Hawaii and next week I ought to have some pictures for you.

Before I left, I mentioned that I was running a survey on the “Three Books on …” series at  http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NXT2B5N. To date, I have had ONE response. I asked readers of this blog to respond whether or not they read the Three Books series.  If you don’t read the series or don’t find it interesting, there is a question for you on how I could be better highlighting the relevance of library resources to Alaskans.

Based on site statistics, I’m hopeful that more than one of you has read the series. So please take this quick survey sometime in the next week.

 Now for the books on Cohoe that I promised.

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This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Cohoe. Here is a description of Cohoe’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Cohoe is located on the Kenai Peninsula on the west bank of the Kasilof River, 13 miles south of the City of Kenai on the Sterling Highway. The community lies at approximately 60.368030° North Latitude and -151.308600° West Longitude. (Sec. 11, T003N, R012W, Seward Meridian.) Cohoe is located in the Kenai Recording District. January temperatures range from 4 to 22 °F. July temperatures vary from 46 to 65 °F. Average annual precipitation is 20 inches.

You can learn more about Cohoe by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find only find one book with Cohoe as a subject:

Alaska. 1980. Material site report, M.S. 461-297-1, Cohoe Road, Kenai B-4. [Alaska]: The Section.

There are also couple of maps, including:

Kenai Peninsula Borough (Alaska). 2007. 2007 central emergency services, Cohoe Loop & vicinity mapbook. [Soldotna, Alaska]: Kenai Peninsula Borough, G.I.S. Division.

Kenai Peninsula Borough (Alaska). 2003. 2003 Cohoe Loop Emergency Services. [Soldotna, AK]: Kenai Peninsula Borough, G.I.S. Division.

I’ll have a fresh look at the survey results from http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NXT2B5N and any comments to this post next weekend and decide the fate of the series then.

Three Books: No Cohoe till April 9th

For several reasons from fun family activities, to being behind on other projects, I’m taking a three week break from the “Three Books on …” series. I expect to post “Three Books on Cohoe” on April 9th.

This is a good time to check in with the readers of this blog and ask a few questions. To ensure privacy in responses, I’ve created a six question survey at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NXT2B5N. I think you could finish it in three minutes or less. I hope you’ll take the time to give feedback on this series.

Regardless of the responses, I’ll definitely post “Three Books on Cohoe” on April 9th. Depending on the quantity and type of feedback, modified by my passion for things Alaskan, I’ll decide on continuing the series after that.

NOTE – I’ll only be checking blog comments irregularly for the rest of the March 2011. If your comments aren’t moderated for a few days, please be patient.

Three Books on Coffman Cove

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Coffman Cove. Here is a description of Coffman Cove’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Coffman Cove is on the northeast coast of Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska. It lies 73 miles northeast of Ketchikan and 42 miles southeast of Wrangell. The community lies at approximately 56.013890° North Latitude and -132.827780° West Longitude. (Sec. 28, T068S, R082E, Copper River Meridian.) Coffman Cove is located in the Ketchikan Recording District. The area encompasses 10.4 sq. miles of land and 4.5 sq. miles of water. The area is dominated by a cool maritime climate. Summer temperatures range from 46 to 70 °F. Winter temperatures range from 32 to 42 °F.

You can learn more about Clark’s Point by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Coffman Cove as a subject, among others:

United States. 2008. Coffman Cove Administrative Site Conveyance Act of 2008: report (to accompany H.R. 831) (including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). Washington, D.C.: U.S. G.P.O. Read this book online.

Peratrovich, Nottingham & Drage, F. James McConnell & Associates, and Alaska. 1997. City of Coffman Cove, Alaska marine commercial/industrial complex: feasibility study. Juneau, Alaska: Peratrovich, Nottingham & Drage, Inc.
Clark, Gerald H. 1980. Managing a nonrenewable resource: the Hidden Falls site, Auke Village, archeology at Coffman Cove. [Juneau, Alaska]: USDA Forest Service, Alaska Region.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Cohoe.