Three Books on Ester (Special)

Notes:

1) Thanks to some extra feedback on my “Three Books” survey, I’m definitely continuing the series. It seems it has a tiny but dedicated fan base and continuing this series also fits in with my impulse to share library resources.

2) In honor of the Ester person who left a comment, I am breaking my “by the alphabet” pattern in this series. According to the list at the Alaska Community Database, the community after Cohoe is Cold Bay.  We’ll get there next week. Today we take a special trip to Ester, Alaska.

————
This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Ester. Here is a description of Ester’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Ester is located 8.5 miles west of Fairbanks on the George Parks Highway. The community lies at approximately 64.847220° North Latitude and -148.014440° West Longitude. (Sec. 07, T001S, R002W, Fairbanks Meridian.) Ester is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. Interior Alaska experiences seasonal temperature extremes. Average January temperatures range from -19 to -2 °F; average July temperatures range from 49 to 71 °F. Annual precipitation averages 11.5 inches, with 67.8 inches of snowfall.

You can learn more about Ester by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Ester as a subject, among others:

 
Stone, Tamsin E. 1990. Adaptive reuse of the Ester Dredge, Ester, Alaska. Thesis (B. Arch.)–Montana State University, 1990.
 
Alaska. 1971. Final environmental impact statement for project F-037-1(25): Ester 25 miles west. Springfield, Va: National Technical Information Service.
 
McCombe, John George. 1927. A study of the gold-bearing quartz veins of Ester Dome. [College, Alaska]: Alaska School of Mines.
 

In addition to the books above, you might want to check out the Ester Republic, a monthly publication known to some as a newspaper which describes itself as “the national rag of the independent people’s republic of ester.”

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Cold Bay.

Short Plea, Then Three Books on Cohoe

I’m back from two great weeks in Hawaii and next week I ought to have some pictures for you.

Before I left, I mentioned that I was running a survey on the “Three Books on …” series at  http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NXT2B5N. To date, I have had ONE response. I asked readers of this blog to respond whether or not they read the Three Books series.  If you don’t read the series or don’t find it interesting, there is a question for you on how I could be better highlighting the relevance of library resources to Alaskans.

Based on site statistics, I’m hopeful that more than one of you has read the series. So please take this quick survey sometime in the next week.

 Now for the books on Cohoe that I promised.

—-

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Cohoe. Here is a description of Cohoe’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Cohoe is located on the Kenai Peninsula on the west bank of the Kasilof River, 13 miles south of the City of Kenai on the Sterling Highway. The community lies at approximately 60.368030° North Latitude and -151.308600° West Longitude. (Sec. 11, T003N, R012W, Seward Meridian.) Cohoe is located in the Kenai Recording District. January temperatures range from 4 to 22 °F. July temperatures vary from 46 to 65 °F. Average annual precipitation is 20 inches.

You can learn more about Cohoe by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find only find one book with Cohoe as a subject:

Alaska. 1980. Material site report, M.S. 461-297-1, Cohoe Road, Kenai B-4. [Alaska]: The Section.

There are also couple of maps, including:

Kenai Peninsula Borough (Alaska). 2007. 2007 central emergency services, Cohoe Loop & vicinity mapbook. [Soldotna, Alaska]: Kenai Peninsula Borough, G.I.S. Division.

Kenai Peninsula Borough (Alaska). 2003. 2003 Cohoe Loop Emergency Services. [Soldotna, AK]: Kenai Peninsula Borough, G.I.S. Division.

I’ll have a fresh look at the survey results from http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NXT2B5N and any comments to this post next weekend and decide the fate of the series then.

Three Books: No Cohoe till April 9th

For several reasons from fun family activities, to being behind on other projects, I’m taking a three week break from the “Three Books on …” series. I expect to post “Three Books on Cohoe” on April 9th.

This is a good time to check in with the readers of this blog and ask a few questions. To ensure privacy in responses, I’ve created a six question survey at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NXT2B5N. I think you could finish it in three minutes or less. I hope you’ll take the time to give feedback on this series.

Regardless of the responses, I’ll definitely post “Three Books on Cohoe” on April 9th. Depending on the quantity and type of feedback, modified by my passion for things Alaskan, I’ll decide on continuing the series after that.

NOTE – I’ll only be checking blog comments irregularly for the rest of the March 2011. If your comments aren’t moderated for a few days, please be patient.

Three Books on Coffman Cove

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Coffman Cove. Here is a description of Coffman Cove’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Coffman Cove is on the northeast coast of Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska. It lies 73 miles northeast of Ketchikan and 42 miles southeast of Wrangell. The community lies at approximately 56.013890° North Latitude and -132.827780° West Longitude. (Sec. 28, T068S, R082E, Copper River Meridian.) Coffman Cove is located in the Ketchikan Recording District. The area encompasses 10.4 sq. miles of land and 4.5 sq. miles of water. The area is dominated by a cool maritime climate. Summer temperatures range from 46 to 70 °F. Winter temperatures range from 32 to 42 °F.

You can learn more about Clark’s Point by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Coffman Cove as a subject, among others:

United States. 2008. Coffman Cove Administrative Site Conveyance Act of 2008: report (to accompany H.R. 831) (including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). Washington, D.C.: U.S. G.P.O. Read this book online.

Peratrovich, Nottingham & Drage, F. James McConnell & Associates, and Alaska. 1997. City of Coffman Cove, Alaska marine commercial/industrial complex: feasibility study. Juneau, Alaska: Peratrovich, Nottingham & Drage, Inc.
Clark, Gerald H. 1980. Managing a nonrenewable resource: the Hidden Falls site, Auke Village, archeology at Coffman Cove. [Juneau, Alaska]: USDA Forest Service, Alaska Region.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Cohoe.

Three Books on Clark’s Point

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Clark’s Point. Here is a description of Clark’s Point’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Clark’s Point is located on a spit on the northeastern shore of Nushagak Bay, 15 miles from Dillingham and 337 miles southwest of Anchorage. The community lies at approximately 58.844170° North Latitude and -158.550830° West Longitude. (Sec. 25, T015S, R056W, Seward Meridian.) Clark’s Point is located in the Bristol Bay Recording District. The area encompasses 3.1 sq. miles of land and 0.9 sq. miles of water. Clark’s Point is located in a climatic transition zone. The primary influence is maritime, although the arctic climate also affects the region. Average summer temperatures range from 37 to 66 °F. Average winter temperatures range from 4 to 30 °F. Average annual precipitation is 20 to 26 inches, and annual snowfall averages 82 inches. Fog and low clouds are common during winter months. The Nushagak Bay is ice-free from June through mid-November.

You can learn more about Clark’s Point by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Clark’s Point as a subject, among others:

McMahan, J. David. 2000. Data recovery at XNB-055, a Norton tradition site at Clarks Point, Alaska (project no. 51352). Anchorage, Alaska (550 W. 7th Ave., Suite 1310, Anchorage 99501-3561): Office of History and Archaeology, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources.

Seitz, Jody. 1996. The use of fish and wildlife in Clark’s Point, Alaska. Juneau: Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence. Read this book online.

Clark’s Point, Alaska: village study, 1966. 1966. Alaska?: Bureau of Indian Affairs?.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Coffman Cove.

Three Books on Clam Gulch

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Clam Gulch. Here is a description of Clam Gulch’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Located on the Kenai Peninsula, Clam Gulch lies on the Sterling Highway 24 miles south of the City of Kenai. The community lies at approximately 60.231110° North Latitude and -151.393610° West Longitude. (Sec. 29, T002N, R012W, Seward Meridian.) Clam Gulch is located in the Kenai Recording District. January temperatures range from 4 to 22 °F. July temperatures vary from 46 to 65 °F. Average annual precipitation is 20 inches.

You can learn more about Clam Gulch by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Clam Gulch as a subject, among others:

 

Johnson, Brent. 2004. Ricochet rhyme: poetry that abounds in binary sounds with memoirs. Clam Gulch, AK: Rotundramen Pub.

Alaska. 1990. Clam Gulch state recreation area. Anchorage, Alaska: Dept. of Natural Resources, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation.

Reger, Douglas R. 1987. Archaeology of a late prehistoric subsistence locality, the Clam Gulch Site (49KEN-045). Fairbanks: University of Alaska Press.

 

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Clark’s Point.

Three Books on Central (Alaska)

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Central. Here is a description of Central’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Central is located on the Steese Highway about 125 miles northeast of Fairbanks and 28 miles southwest of Circle. Circle Hot Springs is located nearby. The community lies at approximately 65.572500° North Latitude and -144.803060° West Longitude. (Sec. 27, T009N, R014E, Fairbanks Meridian.) Central is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. Central has a continental subarctic climate, characterized by seasonal extremes of temperature. Winters are long and harsh, and summers warm and short. The average high temperature during July ranges from 65 to 72 °F. The average low temperature during January is well below zero. Extended periods of -50 to -60 °F are common. Extreme temperatures have been measured, ranging from a low of -71 to a high of 97 °F. Annual precipitation averages 6.5 inches, and annual snowfall averages 43.4 inches.

You can learn more about Central by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Central (Alaska) as a subject, among others:

Jeglum, Connie. 2005. A brief history of the people buried in the Central Cemetery near Central, Alaska. Fairbanks, Alaska: Fairbanks Genealogical Society.

Tyrrell, Laurel Beach. 2002. Living the frontier myth in the twenty-first century. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 2002.

Grahek, M. E. 1982. Centerline soils and materials sources, Circle Hot Springs to Airport. Alaska: Interior Region Design and Construction, Department of Transportation and Public Facilities.

Usually I only cover books in these posts because the series is called “Three Books on …” However I noticed what seem to be a high number of recorded interviews regarding people who lived in or who were knowledgeable about Central Alaska, including:

Tyrrell, Laurel Beach, Pam Haskins, and Rochelle Harrison. 1998. Women of Rural Alaska.

Gelvin, Ed, William S. Schneider, and Dan O’Neill. 1991. Ed Gelvin is interviewed by William Schneider and Dan O’Neill on November 2, 1991. National Park Service collection – Yukon-Charley.

Hall, Esther Oliver, and Mike Dalton. 1973. Esther Oliver Hall is interviewed by Mike Dalton in Central, Alaska on August 10, 1973.

Time for another searching lesson. If you were to type in central alaska into WorldCat as a keyword search, you’d get 10,248 records, very few related to the town of Central. If you tried su:central alaska, you’d cut down the results to 602, but the majority of results would still be unrelated to the town of Central. Try it.

The subject fields of library catalog records are such that community names appear as [Community Name] (state). The subject search su:central alaska pulls up records where the words “central” and “alaska” appear in the subject field, but doesn’t care about the order. We need to put quote marks around the phrase “central alaska” and then we’ll only get records where the subject fields have that phrase. This turns out to be 47.

Another approach would be to search on “circle hot springs”, which is located very close to Central. Books about Circle Hot Springs would probably mention Central. But then you’d already know enough about Central to know it was near Circle Hot Springs.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Clam Gulch.

Three Books on Circle (Alaska)

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Circle. Here is a description of Circle’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Circle is located on the south bank of the Yukon River at the edge of the Yukon Flats, 160 miles northeast of Fairbanks. It is at the eastern end of the Steese Highway. The community lies at approximately 65.825560° North Latitude and -144.060560° West Longitude. (Sec. 31, T012N, R018E, Fairbanks Meridian.) Circle is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. Circle has a continental subarctic climate, characterized by seasonal extremes in temperature. Winters are long and harsh, and summers are warm and short. Summer temperatures range from 65 to 72 °F. Winter temperatures can range from -71 to 0 °F. Annual rainfall averages 6.5 inches, and annual snowfall averages 43.4 inches. The Yukon River is ice-free from mid-June through mid-October.

You can learn more about Circle by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Circle as a subject, among others:

Mertie, John Beaver, L. M. Prindle, and Ron Wendt. 1997. Circle goldfields, 1893-1938. Alaska geological gold series. Wasilla, Alaska: Goldstream Publications.

Alaska. 1992. Final report: watering point, Circle, Alaska. Juneau, AK: Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Village Safe Water.

Fulcomer, Anna. 1898. The three R’s at Circle City / by Anna Fulcomer.

Fun fact: The town was named Circle by the miners who founded the town because they believed the town site was located on the Arctic Circle. They were actually about a degree south off.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Central aka Circle Hot Springs.

Three Books on Chuathbaluk

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Chuathbaluk. Here is a description of Chuathbaluk’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Chuathbaluk is located on the north bank of the Kuskokwim River, 11 miles upriver from Aniak in the Kilbuk-Kuskokwim mountains. It is 87 air miles northeast of Bethel and 310 miles west of Anchorage. The community lies at approximately 61.571940° North Latitude and -159.245000° West Longitude. (Sec. 10, T017N, R055W, Seward Meridian.) Chuathbaluk is located in the Kuskokwim Recording District. The area encompasses 3.5 sq. miles of land and 1.8 sq. miles of water. A continental climate prevails in Chuathbaluk. Snowfall averages 85 inches per year, with total precipitation of 17 inches per year. Temperatures range from -55 to 87 °F. Heavy winds can cause flight delays in the fall. The Kuskokwim River is ice-free from mid-June through October.

You can learn more about Chuathbaluk by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Chuathbaluk as a subject, among others:

Krauthoefer, Tracie A., Jim Simon, Michael Coffing, Madel Kerlin, and Wayne Morgan. 2006. The harvest of non-salmon fish by residents of Aniak and Chuathbaluk, Alaska, 2001-2003. Juneau, Alaska: Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence. Read this book online.

Charnley, Susan. 1984. Human ecology of two central Kuskokwim communities: Chuathbaluk and Sleetmute. Juneau, Alaska: Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence. Read this book online.

Charnley, Susan. 1983. Moose hunting in two central Kuskokwim communities, Chuathbaluk and Sleetmute. Bethel, Alaska: Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence. Read this book online.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Circle.

Three Books on Chitina

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Chitina. Here is a description of Chitina’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Chitina is located on the west bank of the Copper River at its confluence with the Chitina River, at mile 34 of the Edgerton Highway, 53 miles southeast of Copper Center. It lies outside the western boundary of the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, 66 miles southeast of Glennallen. The community lies at approximately 61.515830° North Latitude and -144.436940° West Longitude. (Sec. 14, T004S, R005E, Copper River Meridian.) Chitina is located in the Chitina Recording District. The climate in Chitina is continental, characterized by long, cold winters and relatively warm summers. Total annual precipitation averages 12 inches, with an average annual snowfall of 52 inches. Temperature extremes from a low of -58 to a high of 91 °F have been recorded. Chitina is usually 10° warmer than its neighbor, Kenny Lake.

You can learn more about Chitina by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Chitina as a subject, among others:

Buzzell, Rolfe G. 2003. 2003 cultural resources survey of the Chitina bicycle/pedestrian path, TEA-0850 (23)/60928. Office of History and Archaeology report, no. 103. Anchorage, Alaska: Office of History and Archaeology, Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources.

Clarke, Larry. 2002. Chitina past: the late ’40’s. Mansfield, OH: BookMaster’s Inc.

Shinkwin, Anne D. 1974. Archeological report: Dakah de’nin’s village : an early nineteenth century Ahtna village, Chitina, Alaska. [Fairbanks, Alaska?]: University of Alaska.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Chuathbaluk.