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Three books on Crown Point

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Crown Point. Here is a description of Crown Point’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Crown Point is on the Kenai Peninsula on the Seward Highway and at mile 24.5 of the Alaska Railroad. It lies between Kenai Lake and Lower Trail Lake, 22 miles north of Seward in the Chugach Mountains. The community lies at approximately 60.422220° North Latitude and -149.366670° West Longitude. (Sec. 24, T004N, R001W, Seward Meridian.) Crown Point is located in the Seward Recording District. January temperatures range from 4 to 22 °F. July temperatures vary from 46 to 65 °F. Average annual precipitation is 20 inches.

You can learn more about Crown Point by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, I initially only found a map with a subject search for [crown point alaska], expanding to a keyword search requiring the phrase “crown point” and Alaska, I found these titles which at least mention Crown Point in the book:

Persons, Jean. 2007. From dog sleds to float planes: Alaskan adventures in medicine. Eagle River, Alaska: Northbooks.
Larson, Richard. 1991. Mountain bike Alaska: 49 trails in the 49th state. Anchorage, AK: Glacier House Publications.
Dames & Moore, and Alaska. 1987. Crown Point tank car incident environmental monitoring. Anchorage, Alaska: Dames & Moore.
Our march through WorldCat has taken us through dozens of communities. With July 4th coming up next weekend, I think this is a good time to give this series a pause. A pause, not a cancellation. Due to the number of Alaskan communities, the “Three Books on …” promises to be a multiyear project. Starting next week, I’ve got another Alaskan themed series to get out of the way and I don’t want to wait till 2014 to start sharing it.
We’ll continue our Alaska-themed journey though WorldCat after a few months with the community of Deering.

Three books on Crooked Creek

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Crooked Creek. Here is a description of Crooked Creek’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Crooked Creek is located on the north bank of the Kuskokwim River at its junction with Crooked Creek. It lies in the Kilbuk-Kuskokwim Mountains 50 miles northeast of Aniak, 141 miles northeast of Bethel, and 275 miles west of Anchorage. The community lies at approximately 61.870000° North Latitude and -158.110830° West Longitude. (Sec. 32, T021N, R048W, Seward Meridian.) Crooked Creek is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. A continental climate prevails in the area. Snowfall averages 85 inches per year, with total precipitation averaging 17 inches per year. Temperatures range from -59 to 94 °F. High winds often cause flight delays in the fall and winter. The Kuskokwim is ice-free from mid-June through October.

You can learn more about Crooked Creek by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books about Crooked Creek, among others.

HDR Alaska, Inc, and Crooked Creek (Alaska). 2002. Village of Crooked Creek sanitation facilities master plan. Anchorage, AK: HDR Alaska, Inc.
 
Brelsford, Taylor, Raymond Peterson, and Terry L. Haynes. 1987. An overview of resource use patterns in three central Kuskowim communities Aniak, Crooked Creek and Red Devil. Fairbanks, Alaska: Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence.
 

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Crown Point.

Three books on Craig (Alaska)

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Craig. Here is a description of Craig’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Craig is located on a small island off the west coast of Prince of Wales Island and is connected by a short causeway. It is 31 road miles west of Hollis. It lies 56 air miles northwest of Ketchikan, 750 air miles north of Seattle, and 220 miles south of Juneau. The community lies at approximately 55.476390° North Latitude and -133.148330° West Longitude. (Sec. 06, T074S, R081E, Copper River Meridian.) Craig is located in the Ketchikan Recording District. The area encompasses 6.7 sq. miles of land and 2.7 sq. miles of water. Prince of Wales Island is dominated by a cool, moist, maritime climate. Summer temperatures range from 49 to 63 °F. Winter temperatures range from 32 to 42 °F. Average annual precipitation is 120 inches, and average annual snowfall is 40 inches. Gale winds are common in the fall and winter months.

You can learn more about Craig by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books about Craig, among others.

McGuire, Michael. 2010. Angels to ashes: largest unsolved mass murder in Alaska history. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse.

Mathews, Vincent, Matthew A. Kookesk, and Robert G. Bosworth. 1990. Subsistence harvest and use of sea cucumber in Southeast Alaska: with specific reference to sea cucumber harvest and use by residents of Craig, Klawock and Hydaburg. [Juneau]: Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence.

Craig Community Association. 1939. Constitution and By-laws of the Craig Community Association of Craig, Alaska ratified October 8, 1938. Washington: U.S. G.P.O.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Crooked Creek, was recently hit by flooding.

Three books on Covenant Life (Alaska)

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Covenant Life. Here is a description of Covenant Life’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Covenant Life is located at mile 26 of the Haines Highway near Klehini River. The community lies at approximately 59.399070° North Latitude and -136.078300° West Longitude. (Sec. 29, T028S, R055E, Copper River Meridian.) Covenant Life is located in the Haines Recording District. The area has a maritime climate characterized by cool summers and mild winters. Summer temperatures range from 46 to 76 °F. Winter temperatures range from 13 to 36 °F.

You can learn more about Covenant Life by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find ZERO books about the Covenant Life community in Alaska.

According to its Alaska Community Profile, it has an alternate name of “Whitestone Farm”, but that produced no hits either. What can I say? Sometimes we strike out.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Craig.

Three books on Cordova

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Cordova. Here is a description of Cordova’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Cordova is located at the southeastern end of Prince William Sound in the Gulf of Alaska. The community was built on Orca Inlet at the base of Eyak Mountain. It lies 52 air miles southeast of Valdez and 150 miles southeast of Anchorage. The community lies at approximately 60.542780° North Latitude and -145.757500° West Longitude. (Sec. 28, T015S, R003W, Copper River Meridian.) Cordova is located in the Cordova Recording District. The area encompasses 61.4 sq. miles of land and 14.3 sq. miles of water. Winter temperatures average from 17 to 28 °F. Summer temperatures average from 49 to 63 °F. Average annual precipitation is 167 inches, and average annual snowfall is 80 inches.

You can learn more about Cordova by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Cordova as a subject, among others:

Ott, Riki. 2008. Not one drop: betrayal and courage in the wake of the Exxon
Valdez oil spill
.
White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Pub.

Ritchie, Liesel Ashley. 2004. Voices of Cordova: social capital in the wake
of the Exxon Valdez oil spill
. Thesis (Ph. D.)–Mississippi State
University. Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work.

Forbes, Edgar Allen. 1913. Cordova, the finest harbor in Alaska. New
York, N.Y.: Leslie-Judge Co.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Covenant Life, a religious commune.

Three books on Copper Center

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Copper Center. Here is a description of Copper Center’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Copper Center is located between miles 101 and 105 of the Richardson Highway. It is on the west bank of the Copper River at the confluence of the Klutina River. It lies just west of the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. The community lies at approximately 61.955000° North Latitude and -145.305280° West Longitude. (Sec. 18, T002N, R001E, Copper River Meridian.) Copper Center is located in the Chitina Recording District. Copper Center is located in the continental climate zone. Winters are long and cold, and summers are relatively warm. Temperature extremes have been recorded from a low of -74 to a high of 96 °F. Annual snowfall averages 39 inches, and total precipitation averages 9 inches per year.

You can learn more about Copper Center by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Copper Center as a subject, among others:

Cole, Terrence. 1993. History of the Copper Center Region. Washington, D.C.: Covington & Burling.
 
Reckord, Holly. 1979. A case study of Copper Center, Alaska. [Anchorage]: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Office.
 
Kozely, Lado A. 1963. Copper Center. Anchorage: Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Cordova.

Three books on Cooper Landing

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Cooper Landing. Here is a description of Cooper Landing’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Cooper Landing is at the west end of Kenai Lake on a stretch of the Sterling Highway, 30 miles northwest of Seward in the Chugach Mountains. The community lies at approximately 60.490000° North Latitude and -149.834170° West Longitude. (Sec. 29, T005N, R003W, Seward Meridian.) Cooper Landing is located in the Seward Recording District. January temperatures range from 4 to 22 °F. July temperatures vary from 46 to 65 °F. Average annual precipitation is 20 inches.

You can learn more about Cooper Landing by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Cooper Landing as a subject, among others:

Schulz, Bethany. 1997. Cooper Landing regeneration surveys: preliminary results. Anchorage, AK: USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, State and Private Forestry.

Carley, Kathleen M., Ruth E. Cohn, Laurie Waisel, and William A. Wallace. 1993. The Pothole Lake fire: an analysis of emotion in a successful emergency response. Boulder, CO: Natural Hazards Research and Applications Information Center.

Hope/Sunrise Advisory Planning Commission. 1992.Community recommendations on a land use plan for borough lands: 1992 additions : Hope and Sunrise. Soldotna, Alaska?: Kenai Peninsula Borough?.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Copper Center.

Three books on College (Alaska)

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to College, the home of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). Here is a description of Colleges’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

College is located 3 miles northwest of Fairbanks at mile 467.1 of the Alaska Railroad. The community lies at approximately 64.856940° North Latitude and -147.802780° West Longitude. (Sec. 5, T001S, R001W, Fairbanks Meridian.) College is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. Interior Alaska experiences seasonal temperature extremes. Average January temperatures range from -19 to -2 °F. Average July temperatures range from 49 to 71 °F. Annual precipitation averages 11.5 inches, and annual snowfall averages 67.8 inches. During the winter months, if the temperatures drops below -20 °F, ice fog can occur.

You can learn more about College by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with College as a subject, among others:

Van Cleve, Margaret. 1999. The first 50 years, 1949-1999: University Community Presbyterian Church, College, Alaska. College, Alaska: University Community Presbyterian Church.
 
University of Alaska (College). 1971. Fact book: the University of Alaska, College, Alaska. College: The University.
 
Hessler, Victor Peter, and Eugene Wescott. 1960. Earth current activity at College Alaska, 1956-1958. [College, Alaska]: Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska.

 A WorldCat searching lesson. 90% of the time, a subject search is THE most effective ways to search a library catalog such as WorldCat. You can pull up related items even when the titles and some of the vocabularly don’t match the librarian assigned subject. The case of College Alaska, this breaks down. Doing the the subject search su: college (Alaska) brought up over 600 results, most of which seemed to be about colleges and universities in Alaska. So I chose to do a WorldCat title search of ti:”college alaska”, which gave me a little over a 100 books, most of which were either about or took place in College, Alaska. If what you’re looking for has common words that might appear in many subject headings, consider a title search.

I note that it is still way easier to bring up materials on College, Alaska on WorldCat than on Google. To be fair, a “college alaska” search on Google gives you a map and a wikipedia entry, but then it gives you all sorts of unrelated materials on colleges in Alaska that are far away from the community of College Alaska.

However, the first page of Google search results may eventually include this blog entry, which would allow the casual user to zero in better on College, Alaska. That is the power of librarian added value.

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Cooper Landing.

Three books on Coldfoot

This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Coldfoot. Here is a description of Coldfoot’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Coldfoot is located at the mouth of Slate Creek on the east bank of the Middle Fork Koyukuk River. It lies at mile 175 of the Dalton Highway, formerly known as the North Slope Haul Road. The community lies at approximately 67.256390° North Latitude and -150.184170° West Longitude. (Sec. 16, T028N, R012W, Fairbanks Meridian.) Coldfoot is located in the Fairbanks Recording District. The area encompasses 37.0 sq. miles of land and 0.0 sq. miles of water. The climate of the area is strongly continental. Temperatures range from -14 to 50 °F. Annual precipitation averages 10 inches, and snowfall averages 63 inches per year.

You can learn more about Coldfoot by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Coldfoot as a subject, among others:

Will, Susan M. 1981. Coldfoot, an historic mining community on the middle fork of the Koyukuk River, Alaska. Fairbanks, Alaska: Yukon Resource Area, Bureau of Land Management.
 

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to College, AK home of many university students and faculty, as one might expect.

Three Books on Cold Bay

Note: After this week “Three Books On …” is moving to Mondays. The next community will appear on May 2nd.

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This week our “Three Books on …” series takes us to Cold Bay. Here is a description of Cold  Bay’s location and climate from the Alaska Community Database:

Cold Bay is located in the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge at the western end of the Alaska Peninsula. It lies 634 miles southwest of Anchorage and 180 miles northeast of Unalaska. The community lies at approximately 55.185830° North Latitude and -162.721110° West Longitude. (Sec. 01, T058S, R089W, Seward Meridian.) Cold Bay is located in the Aleutian Islands Recording District. The area encompasses 54.4 sq. miles of land and 16.6 sq. miles of water. The city has a maritime climate, with temperatures ranging from 25 to 60 °F. The average annual rainfall is 36 inches, and average annual snowfall is 55 inches. Wind speeds of 30 mph are common for Cold Bay

You can learn more about Cold Bay by reading their full profile from the Alaska Community Database.

Looking through WorldCat, we find these three books with Cold Bay as a subject, among others:

Wilson, Frederic H. 1997. Cold Bay quadrangle: Alaska resource data file. [Menlo Park, CA]: U.S. Geological Survey. Read online at http://ardf.wr.usgs.gov/quads/html/ColdBay.html.

Clawson, Linn E. 1993. The cost of living.
 
United States. 1973. On scene coordinator’s report: major oil spill, Cold Bay, Alaska. Anchorage, Alaska: U.S. Coast Guard].

Join us next week as our trek through WorldCat takes us to Coldfoot.

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